Concept

Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact

Summary
The Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact, also known as the Japanese–Soviet Non-aggression Pact, was a non-aggression pact between the Soviet Union and the Empire of Japan signed on April 13, 1941, two years after the conclusion of the Soviet-Japanese Border War. The agreement meant that for most of World War II, the two nations fought against each other's allies but not against each other. In 1945, late in the war, the Soviets scrapped the pact and joined the Allied campaign against Japan. Background After the Fall of France and then the expansion of the Axis Powers, the Soviet Union wished to mend its diplomatic relations in the Far East to safeguard its eastern border and to concentrate on the European Theatre of World War II. On the other hand, the Empire of Japan was bogged down in a seemingly-interminable war against China and had rapidly-deteriorating diplomatic relations with the United States. Those factors made the Japanese seek an accommodation with the Soviet Union t
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