Concept

Chasseurs d'Afrique

Summary
The Chasseurs d'Afrique were a light cavalry corps of chasseurs in the French Armée d'Afrique (Army of Africa). First raised in 1831 from regular French cavalry posted to Algeria, they numbered five regiments by World War II. For most of their history they were recruited from either French volunteers or French settlers in North Africa doing their military service. As such they were the mounted equivalent of the French Zouave infantry. The other major cavalry element in the Armee d'Afrique were the Spahis—recruited from the indigenous peoples of Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco with mostly French officers. History First raised in 1831, shortly after the French occupation of Algiers, the Chasseurs d'Afrique (Chass. d'Af. in common vernacular) were created through transfers from the chasseurs à cheval, other metropolitan cavalry regiments and some infantry units. Initially about 40 members of each squadron were locally recruited indigenous horsemen. Two additional regiments were
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