Concept

Trill consonant

Summary
In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator. Standard Spanish as in perro, for example, is an alveolar trill. A trill is made by the articulator being held in place and the airstream causing it to vibrate. Usually a trill vibrates for 2–3 contacts, but may be up to 5, or even more if geminate. However, trills may also be produced with only one contact. While single-contact trills are similar to taps and flaps, a tap or flap differs from a trill in that it is made by a muscular contraction rather than airstream. Phonemic trills Trill consonants included in the International Phonetic Alphabet:
  • [r] – Voiced alveolar trill
  • [r̥] – Voiceless alveolar trill
  • [ʙ] – Voiced bilabial trill
  • [ʙ̥] – Voiceless bilabial trill
  • [ɽ͡r] – Voiced retroflex trill
  • [ʀ] – Voiced uvular trill
  • [ʀ̥] – Voiceless uvular trill
  • [ʢ] – voiced epiglottal trill
  • [ʜ] – voiceless epiglottal trill
In addition, *
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