Concept

Borel regular measure

Summary
In mathematics, an outer measure μ on n-dimensional Euclidean space Rn is called a Borel regular measure if the following two conditions hold:
  • Every Borel set B ⊆ Rn is μ-measurable in the sense of Carathéodory's criterion: for every A ⊆ Rn, ::\mu (A) = \mu (A \cap B) + \mu (A \setminus B).
  • For every set A ⊆ Rn there exists a Borel set B ⊆ Rn such that A ⊆ B and μ(A) = μ(B).
Notice that the set A need not be μ-measurable: μ(A) is however well defined as μ is an outer measure. An outer measure satisfying only the first of these two requirements is called a Borel measure, while an outer measure satisfying only the second requirement (with the Borel set B replaced by a measurable set B) is called a regular measure. The Lebesgue outer measure on Rn is an example of a Borel regular measure. It can be proved that a Borel regular measure, although introduced here as an outer measure (only countably subadditive)
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