Concept

Enabling act

Summary
An enabling act is a piece of legislation by which a legislative body grants an entity which depends on it (for authorization or legitimacy) the power to take certain actions. For example, enabling acts often establish government agencies to carry out specific government policies in a modern nation. The effects of enabling acts from different times and places vary widely. Germany The German word for an enabling act is Ermächtigungsgesetz. It usually refers to the enabling act of 23 March 1933 which became a cornerstone of Adolf Hitler's seizure of power. Acts of 1914–1927 The first enabling act is dated from 4 August 1914 just after the German entry into World War I. With the vote of the Social Democratic Party, the Reichstag (the German Empire's parliament) agreed to give the government certain powers to take the necessary economic measures during the war. Such enabling acts were also common in other countries. The Reichstag had to be informed, and had the rig
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