Concept

Catullus

Summary
Gaius Valerius Catullus (ˈɡaːiʊs waˈɫɛriʊs kaˈtʊlːʊs; 84 - 54 BCE), often referred to simply as Catullus (kaˈtʊlːʊs, ), was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, focusing on personal life rather than classical heroes. His surviving works are still read widely and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art. Catullus's poems were widely appreciated by contemporary poets, significantly influencing Ovid and Virgil, among others. After his rediscovery in the Late Middle Ages, Catullus again found admirers such as Petrarch. The explicit sexual imagery which he uses in some of his poems has shocked many readers. Yet, at many instruction levels, Catullus is considered a resource for teachers of Latin. Catullus's style is highly personal, humorous, and emotional; he frequently uses hyperbole, anaphora, alliteration, and diminutives. In 25 of his poems, he mentions his devotion to a woman he refers to as "Lesbia", who is widely be
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