Concept

LL parser

Summary
In computer science, an LL parser (Left-to-right, leftmost derivation) is a top-down parser for a restricted context-free language. It parses the input from Left to right, performing Leftmost derivation of the sentence. An LL parser is called an LL(k) parser if it uses k tokens of lookahead when parsing a sentence. A grammar is called an LL(k) grammar if an LL(k) parser can be constructed from it. A formal language is called an LL(k) language if it has an LL(k) grammar. The set of LL(k) languages is properly contained in that of LL(k+1) languages, for each k ≥ 0. A corollary of this is that not all context-free languages can be recognized by an LL(k) parser. An LL parser is called LL-regular (LLR) if it parses an LL-regular language. The class of LLR grammars contains every LL(k) grammar for every k. For every LLR grammar there exists an LLR parser that parses the grammar in linear time. Two nomenclative outlier parser types are LL(*) and LL(finite). A parser is called L
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