Concept

Angels in Judaism

Summary
In Judaism, angels ( mal’āḵ, plural: mal’āḵīm, literally "messenger") are supernatural beings that appear throughout the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), rabbinic literature, apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, and traditional Jewish liturgy as agents of the God of Israel. They are categorized in different hierarchies. Their essence is often associated with fire. The Talmud describes their very essence as fire. Etymology Hebrew mal’akh () is the standard word for "messenger", both human and divine, in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), though it is rarely used for human messengers in Modern Hebrew as the latter is usually denoted by the term shaliyakh (). The noun derives from the verbal consonantal root l-’-k (), meaning specifically "to send with a message" and with time was substituted with more applicable sh-l-h. In Biblical Hebrew this root is attested only in this noun and in the noun "Melakhah" (), meaning "work", "occupation" or "craftsmanship". The morphological structure of the word ma
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