Concept

Eilvese transmitter

Summary
Eilvese transmitter was an early long-distance radiotelegraphy station at Eilvese, Germany owned by Transradio AG, used for transmission of telegrams. It went into service in 1913, exchanging commercial and diplomatic Morse code traffic on VLF frequencies with Germany's colonies, and a similar station at Tuckerton, New Jersey, USA. During World War I when the allies cut Germany's submarine telegraph cables it was one of two long-distance radiotelegraphy stations which maintained Germany's contact with the rest of the world, and was used for diplomatic negotiations between Woodrow Wilson and Kaiser Wilhelm II leading to the 1918 Armistice which ended World War I. It transmitted on 96 kHz with a 100 kW Goldschmidt alternator. There were two antennas: an umbrella antenna, which was mounted in the middle on a 250-metre-tall guyed mast, and at the sides by six 20-metre-tall wooden masts and a ring antenna, which was spun between the central mast and the radial masts. The c
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