Concept

Fiscus Judaicus

Summary
The fiscus Iudaicus or Judaicus (Latin for "Jewish tax") was a tax imposed on Jews in the Roman Empire after the destruction of Jerusalem and its Temple in AD 70. Revenues were directed to the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus in Rome. The tax measure improved Rome's finances and also worked as a deterrent against proselytizing. Those who paid the tax did not have to sacrifice to Roman gods. Contemporary sources Modern knowledge of the fiscus Judaicus is found in four primary sources:
  • A small number of Roman Egyptian tax receipts
  • A passage from The Jewish War by Josephus
  • A passage from The Twelve Caesars by Suetonius
  • A passage from the Roman History by Cassius Dio
Imposition The tax was initially imposed by Roman emperor Vespasian as one of the measures against Jews as a result of the First Roman-Jewish War, or first Jewish revolt of AD
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