Concept

Coppola cap

Summary
The coppola (ˈkɔppola) is a traditional kind of flat cap typically worn in Sicily, Campania and Calabria, where is it known as còppula or berretto, and also seen in Malta, Crete, Corsica, and Sardinia (where it came to be known, in the local language, as berritta, cicía, and bonete or bonetu, possibly from the Latin abonnis). Today, the coppola is widely regarded, at least in Italy, as an iconic symbol of Sicilian, Campanian or Calabrian heritage. History One popular theory of the coppola is that it originates in Anglo-Saxon land, where the tradition of civil caps has been found at least since the late 16th century during the reign of the Tudors, when on Sundays and on holidays all males over six years old – with the exception of nobles and high-ranking people – had to wear woolen headdresses produced only and exclusively in England: so, in fact, it provided for an act of parliament of 1571, the short purpose of which was to support the domestic production of wool, thus p
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