Concept

Harland Bartholomew

Summary
Harland Bartholomew (September 14, 1889 – December 2, 1989) was the first full-time urban planner employed by an American city. A civil engineer by training, Harland was a planner with St. Louis, Missouri, for 37 years. His work and teachings were widely influential, particularly on the use of government to enforce racial segregation in land use. Early life and education Bartholomew was born in Stoneham, Massachusetts, on September 14, 1889. He moved to New York City when he was 15 and attended Erasmus High School in Brooklyn. He completed two years of a civil engineering degree at Rutgers University but ran out of money to continue its completion. He was later awarded an honorary degree in civil engineering from Rutgers University in 1921. In 1912, he began working with E.P. Goodrich, a civil engineering firm that was a strong advocate for the efficient planning of cities. His work with Goodrich consisted principally of
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