Concept

Charcoal-burning suicide

Summary
Charcoal-burning suicide is suicide by burning charcoal in a closed room or area. Death occurs by carbon monoxide poisoning. Mechanism of action Carbon monoxide poisoning As the charcoal burns, the concentration of carbon monoxide (CO), produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon, gradually increases. CO concentrations of as little as one part per thousand can be fatal if inhaled over a period of two hours. History One of the earliest known suicides by inhalation of charcoal fumes may have been that of Seneca (65 AD) as well as Amédée Berthollet (1811), son of Claude Louis Berthollet. The suicide method also appears in nineteenth-century literature such as Eugène Sue's The Wandering Jew (1844). Incidents Two students of Taipei First Girls' High School ended their lives by charcoal-burning in a hotel in Su'ao, Yilan in July 1994. They left a note that did not state the reason for killing themselves clearly, even though that it was suspected in some ma
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading