Concept

Isotropic line

Summary
In the geometry of quadratic forms, an isotropic line or null line is a line for which the quadratic form applied to the displacement vector between any pair of its points is zero. An isotropic line occurs only with an isotropic quadratic form, and never with a definite quadratic form. Using complex geometry, Edmond Laguerre first suggested the existence of two isotropic lines through the point (α, β) that depend on the imaginary unit i: : First system: (y - \beta) = (x - \alpha) i, : Second system: (y - \beta) = -i (x - \alpha) . Laguerre then interpreted these lines as geodesics: :An essential property of isotropic lines, and which can be used to define them, is the following: the distance between any two points of an isotropic line situated at a finite distance in the plane is zero. In other terms, these lines satisfy the differential equation ds2 = 0. On an arbitrary surface one can stud
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