Concept

Single-level store

Summary
Single-level storage (SLS) or single-level memory is a computer storage term which has had two meanings. The two meanings are related in that in both, pages of memory may be in primary storage (RAM) or in secondary storage (disk), and that the physical location of a page is unimportant to a process. The term originally referred to what is now usually called virtual memory, which was introduced in 1962 by the Atlas system at the University of Manchester. In modern usage, the term usually refers to the organization of a computing system in which there are no , only persistent objects (sometimes called segments), which are mapped into processes' address spaces (which consist entirely of a collection of mapped objects). The entire storage of the computer is thought of as a single two-dimensional plane of addresses (segment, and address within segment). The persistent object concept was first introduced by Multics in the mid-1960s, in a project shared by MIT, General Electric and Bell La
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading