Concept

Prohibition in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union

Summary
Prohibition in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union existed during 1914–25. The Russian term is "сухой закон" (sukhoy zakon, literally "dry law"). Russian Empire Prohibition as introduced in the Russian Empire in 1914 permitted the sale of hard liquor only in restaurants. It was introduced at the beginning of World War I with a belief that it would prevent the army from dealing with drunken soldiers. Other warring countries (e.g. the United Kingdom, France, and Germany) imposed certain restrictions on alcoholic drinks, but only Russia completely stopped the retail sale of vodka. Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union Prohibition continued through the turmoil of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the Russian Civil War, into the period of Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union until 1925. In the Soviet Union, there were three major anti-alcohol campaigns: started in 1958, 1972, and 1985. Gorbachev's anti-alcohol campaign During 1985–1987, Mikhail Gorbachev
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