Concept

Ribot's law

Summary
Ribot's law of retrograde amnesia was hypothesized in 1881 by Théodule Ribot. It states that there is a time gradient in retrograde amnesia, so that recent memories are more likely to be lost than the more remote memories. Not all patients with retrograde amnesia report the symptoms of Ribot's law. History and context Ribot's law was first postulated by the French psychologist Théodule Ribot (1839–1916), who is recognized as one of the pioneer 19th century advocates for psychology as an objective and biologically based empirical field. Ribot's split from the mainstream "Eclectic" psychology of the era was associated with a transition from philosophical to evolutionary explanations of human psychology and behavior. As Ribot was not a true experimentalist himself, this increased focus on the natural science basis of human mentality was manifested in an interest for case studies and diseases of dysfunction which helped to shape theories of psychological function. Ribot's law act
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading