Concept

Superfluid film

Summary
Superfluidity is a phenomenon where a fluid, or a fraction of a fluid, loses all its viscosity and can flow without resistance, which can form thin films. Superfluid helium, for example, forms a 30-nm-thick film on the surface of any container. The film's properties cause the helium to climb the walls of the container and, if this is not closed, flow out. Superfluidity and superconductivity are macroscopic manifestations of quantum mechanics. There is considerable interest, both theoretical and practical, in these quantum phase transitions. There has been a tremendous amount of work done in the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena in two dimensions. Much of the interest in this field is because as the number of dimensions increases, the number of exactly solvable models diminishes drastically. In three or more dimensions one must resort to a mean field theory approach. The theory of superfluid transitions in two dimensions is known as the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) theor
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