Concept

Schrödinger method

Summary
In combinatorial mathematics and probability theory, the Schrödinger method, named after the Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger, is used to solve some problems of distribution and occupancy. Suppose :X_1,\dots,X_n , are independent random variables that are uniformly distributed on the interval [0, 1]. Let :X_{(1)},\dots,X_{(n)} , be the corresponding order statistics, i.e., the result of sorting these n random variables into increasing order. We seek the probability of some event A defined in terms of these order statistics. For example, we might seek the probability that in a certain seven-day period there were at most two days in on which only one phone call was received, given that the number of phone calls during that time was 20. This assumes uniform distribution of arrival times. The Schrödinger method begins by assigning a Poisson distribution with expected value λt to the number of observations in the interval [0, t
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading