Concept

Concatenative programming language

Summary
A concatenative programming language is a point-free computer programming language in which all expressions denote functions, and the juxtaposition of expressions denotes function composition. Concatenative programming replaces function application, which is common in other programming styles, with function composition as the default way to build subroutines. Example For example, a sequence of operations in an applicative language like the following: y = foo(x) z = bar(y) w = baz(z) ...is written in a concatenative language as a sequence of functions: x foo bar baz Functions and procedures written in concatenative style are not value level, i.e. they typically do not represent the data structures they operate on with explicit names or identifiers. Instead they are function level a function is defined as a pipeline, or a sequence of operations that take parameters from an implicit data structure upon which all functions operate, and return the function results t
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