Concept

Army Officer Selection Board

Summary
Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB) is an assessment centre used by the British Army as part of the officer selection process for the regular army and Army Reserve and related scholarship schemes. The board is based at Leighton House, Westbury in Wiltshire, England in a dedicated camp. It is commanded by the President AOSB, a colonel in the British Army, supported by a number of vice-presidents. The current President is Col. Lucy Giles. AOSB is an equivalent of the Navy's Admiralty Interview Board and the Officer and Aircrew Selection Centre of the Royal Air Force. War Office Selection Boards The AOSB has its roots in the War Office Selection Boards (WOSBs), created by Army psychiatrists in 1942 during World War II. They involved candidates taking a three-day stay in a country house, where tests were administered including written tests of mental ability, questionnaires, leaderless group tests and interviews. Psychiatrists and some psychological components of the WOSBs were removed from the Boards after the war. The Army Officer Selection Board was known as the Regular Commissions Board (RCB). In 1949, the RCB moved from Sussex to its current facilities at Leighton House in Westbury, Wiltshire. Both Regular and Army Reserve officers are screened here. Applicants for the British Army undergo initial suitability assessments, through computer-based tests and interviews, along a number of routes. All officer candidates will be required to attend AOSB at a point determined by the type of entry. Candidates for scholarship, Welbeck Defence Sixth Form College and professionally qualified officers will attend only one board; other entrants will be required to attend both a briefing board and a main board. Candidates will usually have undertaken insight or familiarisation visits to appropriate units prior to attendance at the board. Candidates are divided into groups of six to eight, each supervised by a group leader who is a major or captain and who runs the activities and records evidence.
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