Concept

Flodoard

Summary
Flodoard of Reims (Flodoardus; 893/4 – 28 March 966) was a Frankish chronicler and priest of the cathedral church of Reims in the West Frankish kingdom during the decades following the dissolution of the Carolingian Empire. His historical writings are major sources for the history of Western Europe, especially France, in the early and mid-tenth century. The sources for Flodoard's life are almost exclusively his own writings. Local tradition holds that he was born at Épernay. He was educated at the cathedral school of Reims which had been established by Archbishop Fulk. As a young canon of Reims, he gained prominent roles in the administrations of the archbishops Heriveus (900–22) and Seulf (922–25), particularly in the cathedral scriptorium. Following Seulf's death in 925, the magnate Herbert II, Count of Vermandois installed his four-year-old son, Hugh, as the new archbishop. Flodoard refused to participate in the boy's election, and was stripped of his position and benefices. In 931, Reims was captured from Count Herbert by King Raoul and Duke Hugh the Great, who ejected Hugh and oversaw the election of a new archbishop, Artold. Flodoard appears to have regained his charges under Artold's leadership. In 936/7, he visited Rome, perhaps on pilgrimage, where he met Pope Leo VII. Herbert recaptured Reims in 940, deposing Artold and reimposing his son Hugh on the see. Flodoard objected to the invasion of the bishopric on canonical grounds; consequently, he was detained by Herbert and once again stripped of his prebends. Between 943 and 946, Flodoard may have been away from Reims with Artold at the court of King Louis IV. In 946, Louis gained control of Reims with the assistance of the East Frankish ruler Otto I. Hugh was again deposed, and Artold was re-ordained. His claim to the see was eventually ratified at the 948 Synod of Ingelheim, which Flodoard attended. In 951, Flodoard was sent to Otto's court at Aachen, where he represented the church of Reims in a property dispute, and he seems to have been involved in the administration of his church's property.
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