Concept

Sandal

Summary
Sandals are an open type of shoe, consisting of a sole held to the wearer's foot by straps going over the instep and around the ankle. Sandals can also have a heel. While the distinction between sandals and other types of footwear can sometimes be blurry (as in the case of huaraches—the woven leather footwear seen in Mexico, and peep-toe pumps), the common understanding is that a sandal leaves all or most of the foot exposed. People may choose to wear sandals for several reasons, among them comfort in warm weather, economy (sandals tend to require less material than shoes and are usually easier to construct), and as a fashion choice. Usually, people wear sandals in warmer climates or during warmer parts of the year in order to keep their feet cool and dry. The risk of developing athlete's foot is lower than with enclosed shoes, and the wearing of sandals may be part of the treatment regimen for such an infection. The English word derives under influence from Middle French from the Latin and is first attested in Middle English in the form sandalies. The Latin term derived from Greek sandálion (), the diminutive of sándalon (), of uncertain origin. In Greek, the names referred to particular styles of women's sandals rather than being the general word for the category of footwear. Similarly, in Latin, the name was also used for slippers, the more common term for Roman sandals being , whence English sole. The English words sand and sandalwood are both false cognates. Although some other kinds of footwear like carbatina are as simple to make, sandals are the oldest known footwear at present. Pairs of sagebrush sandals discovered in 1938 at Fort Rock Cave in Oregon, USA, were later dated to 10,500 to 9,300 years ago. The ancient Egyptians wore sandals made of palm leaves, papyrus, andat least in grave goodsgold. Egyptian statues and reliefs show sandals both on the feet and carried by sandal-bearers. According to Herodotus, papyrus footwear was part of the required dress of the Egyptian priests.
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