Concept

Maurice Pujo

Summary
Maurice Pujo (mɔʁis pyʒo, moʁ-; 26 January 1872 – 6 September 1955) was a French journalist and co-founder of the nationalist and monarchist Action Française movement. He became the leader of the Camelots du Roi, the youth organization of the Action Française which took part in many right-wing demonstrations in the years before World War II (1939–45). After World War II he was imprisoned for collaborationist activity. Life Early years Maurice Pujo was born on 26 January 1872. His family was Catholic and royalist. Pujo studied at the lycée in Orléans at the same time as Charles Péguy. When he was eighteen he won a prize for an essay on Spinoza's moral philosophy. He expected to make a career as a literary critic. He launched the journal La Revue jeune, later renamed L’Art et la Vie, which lasted for a few years. He was fluent in German, very interested in German culture and an ardent follower of Richard Wagner. In 1894 he published his first book, Le règne de la grâc
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