Concept

Lithe

Summary
Lithe is an experimental programming language created in 1982 by David Sandberg at the University of Washington which allows the programmer to freely choose their own syntax. Lithe combines the ideas of syntax-directed translation and classes in a novel manner that results in a remarkably simple yet powerful language. Overview The standard class-based programming model does not specify a mechanism by which to manipulate objects: where Smalltalk uses message passing, Lithe uses syntax-directed translation (SDT). SDT is a method of translating a string into a sequence of actions by attaching on such action to each rule of a grammar. Thus, parsing a string of the grammar produces a sequence of rule applications. Lithe merges SDT with the class model by using classes as the non-terminal alphabet of the grammar. Since the grammar class used by Lithe properly contains all context-free grammars, a wide variety of syntax can be described, and SDT provides a simple way to attach seman
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading