Concept

Netstat

Summary
In computing, netstat (network statistics) is a command-line network utility that displays network connections for Transmission Control Protocol (both incoming and outgoing), routing tables, and a number of network interface (network interface controller or software-defined network interface) and network protocol statistics. It is available on Unix, Plan 9, Inferno, and Unix-like operating systems including macOS, Linux, Solaris and BSD. It is also available on IBM OS/2 and on Microsoft Windows NT-based operating systems including Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is used for finding problems in the network and to determine the amount of traffic on the network as a performance measurement. On Linux this program is mostly obsolete, although still included in many distributions. On Linux, netstat (part of "net-tools") is superseded by ss (part of iproute2). The replacement for netstat -r is ip route, the replacement for netstat -i is ip -s link, and the replacement for netstat -g is ip maddr, all of which are recommended instead. Netstat provides statistics for the following: Proto – The name of the protocol (TCP or UDP). Local Address – The IP address of the local computer and the port number being used. The name of the local computer that corresponds to the IP address and the name of the port is shown unless the parameter is specified. An asterisk () is shown for the host if the server is listening on all interfaces. If the port is not yet established, the port number is shown as an asterisk. Foreign Address – The IP address and port number of the remote computer to which the socket is connected. The names that corresponds to the IP address and the port are shown unless the parameter is specified. If the port is not yet established, the port number is shown as an asterisk (). State – Indicates the state of a TCP connection. The possible states are as follows: , and . For more information about the states of a TCP connection, see . Parameters used with this command must be prefixed with a hyphen () rather than a slash ().
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