Concept

Sukerchakia Misl

Summary
The Sukerchakia Misl was one of twelve. Sikh misls in Punjab during the 18th century, concentrated in Gujranwala and Hafizabad districts in western Punjab (in modern-Pakistan) and ruled from (1752–1801). The misl was founded by Charat Singh of Sandhawalia, grandfather of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. The last Sukerchakia Misldar (commander of the Misl) was Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Towards the end of the eighteenth century, Maharaja Ranjit Singh united all the misls and established an independent Sikh Empire. The earliest traceable ancestor of the Sukerchakia family with reliable historicity was Kalu (died c.1488), a Jat of the Warraich got (clan), who moved in c.1470 from his native village of Bhatian (in modern-day Lahore district) to Sansara (or Sansi; located in modern-day Ajnala tehsil, Amritsar district, Punjab, India) with his spouse. Later-on, he would further shift his family to Sand, a village approximately six kilometres from Wazirabad. Whilst Kalu had his residence in Sansi, he gave birth to a son named Jaddoman. Jaddoman became a plunderer associated with the Sansi tribe. He died in c.1515 on a marauding expeditions and was survived by a son named Galeb (also known as Mannu). Galeb also became a plunderer and was renowned for it. He died in c.1549 and was survived by a son named Kiddoh. Kiddoh shifted his residence from his native village to the village of Sukerchak in c.1555. The etymology of the name of the later Misl originates from the toponym of this village. The village was located approximately 3 kilometres away from Gujranwala. Kiddoh is said to have been spiritually disposed and started working on the land as an agricultural labourer. Kiddoh died in c.1578 and was survived by two sons named Rajadab and Premu. Rajadab would open a grocery store in the village, worked also as an agriculturalist, and was versed and literate in the Landa script. Rajadab died in c.1620 and left behind three sons named Nilu, Telu, and Takht Mal.
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