Concept

Pordenone

Summary
Pordenone (pordeˈnoːne; Venetian and Pordenon) is a comune (municipality) of the northeast Italian region of Friuli Venezia Giulia, the capital of the Regional decentralization entity of Pordenone . The name comes from Latin Portus Naonis, meaning 'port on the Noncello River'. Pordenone was created at the beginning of the High Middle Ages as a river port on the Noncello, with the name Portus Naonis. In the area, however, there were already villas and agricultural settlements from the Roman age, especially in the area of the town of Torre. Between 1257 and 1270 Pordenone was conquered by Ottokar II of Bohemia, who was eventually defeated in 1277, when the city was brought back to the Empire, under Rodolph I of Habsburg. In 1278, after having been administrated by several feudatories, the city was handed over to the Habsburg family, forming an Austrian enclave within the territory of the Patriarchal State of Friuli. In the 14th century, Pordenone grew substantially due to the flourishing river trades, gaining the status of city in December 1314. In 1508, after the failed invasion of the Republic of Venice by Emperor Maximilian, the city was seized by Venice. Despite temporary Austrian occupation during the subsequent War of the League of Cambrai (1509–16), the Venetian sovereignty over Pordenone was confirmed in 1516. Until 1537, the town was ruled by the feudal family d'Alviano, as a reward for Bartolomeo d'Alviano's military service to the Republic. Under Venice a new port was built and the manufacturers improved. After the Napoleonic period, Pordenone was included in the Austrian possessions in Italy (Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia). The railway connection, including Pordenone railway station (1855), and the construction of the Pontebbana road brought on the decline of the port, but spurred substantial industrial development (especially for the working of cotton). Pordenone was annexed to Italy in 1866. The cotton sector decayed after the damage of World War I and failed completely after the 1929 crisis.
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