Concept

Rochdale Principles

Summary
The Rochdale Principles are a set of ideals for the operation of cooperatives. They were first set out in 1844 by the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers in Rochdale, England and have formed the basis for the principles on which co-operatives around the world continue to operate. The implications of the Rochdale Principles are a focus of study in co-operative economics. The original Rochdale Principles were officially adopted by the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) in 1937 as the Rochdale Principles of Co-operation. Updated versions of the principles were adopted by the ICA in 1966 as the Co-operative Principles and in 1995 as part of the Statement on the Co-operative Identity. Current ICA version of co-operative principles The Rochdale Principles, according to the 1995 ICA revision, can be summarised as follows. Voluntary and open membership The first of the Rochdale Principles states that co-operative societies must have an open and voluntary me
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