Concept

Ajahn Khemadhammo

Summary
Ajahn Khemadhammo OBE (also known as Chao Khun Bhavanaviteht; born ) is a Theravāda Buddhist monk. He is one of the founders of the Thai Forest Tradition in the West. Khemadhammo was born in Portsmouth, England. In 1971, after training at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama and Drama Centre, London and practising as a professional actor, working for several years at the Royal National Theatre in London with Laurence Olivier and Edward Petherbridge (a period in which he appeared in Shakespearian dramas as well as in plays by Tom Stoppard and Anton Chekov, studying intensively Stanislavski's system), he travelled to Thailand via the in India. In December 1971 in Bangkok he became a novice monk and about a month later moved to Ubon to stay with Ajahn Chah at Wat Nong Pah Pong : Wat Nong Pah Pong (Generally shortened to: Wat Pah Pong, Thai: วัดหนองป่าพง) is a Theravada Buddhist hermitage in Ubon Ratchathani Province, (Amphoe) Warin Chamrap, devoted to the practice of contemplation, Dhutanga practice and asceticism which was established by the late Ajahn Chah as the main monastery of the Thai Forest Tradition. On the day before Vesakha Puja of that year, 1972, Ajahn Khemadhammo received Upasampadā as a bhikkhu, a fully ordained Buddhist monk. In 1977, Khemadhammo returned to the UK with Ajahn Chah and stayed with him during his two-month visit at the old Hampstead Vihara. After Ajahn Chah's return to Thailand, Ajahn Khemadhammo remained at Hampstead and eighteen months later set up a small recluse monastery on the Isle of Wight. In 1984, at the invitation of a group of Buddhist Samatha and Vipassanā meditators that he had been visiting monthly for some years, he moved to Banner Hill near Kenilworth and formed the Buddha-Dhamma Fellowship. In 1985, he moved to his current residence, the contemplative Forest Hermitage, a property in Warwickshire; in 1987, with considerable help from meditator-acolytes and devotees in Thailand, this land was purchased by the Buddha-Dhamma Fellowship.
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