Concept

Edward Quinan

Summary
General Sir Edward Pellew Quinan (9 January 1885 – 13 November 1960) was a British Army commander during the Second World War. In the early part of his career, he was involved in Indian Army campaigns in Afghanistan and Waziristan on the North West Frontier of the Indian Empire, in the days of the British Raj. During the First World War he served with the Indian Army forces in France and Mesopotamia, and was wounded. During the Second World War, Quinan commanded the British and Indian Army forces in the Anglo-Iraqi War, the Syria–Lebanon campaign, and the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran. He continued serving in the Middle East until 1943, when he returned to India to command the North West Army, but retired later the same year due to a downgrading of his fitness status. Quinan was of Anglo-Irish descent and was born in Calcutta on 9 January 1885; his father died when he was ten years old. Although his mother later remarried, he was brought up and educated in Dublin by his grandparents and aunts, until he entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in 1903. Commissioned a second lieutenant on 9 January 1904, Quinan joined the Indian Army (27th Punjabis) on 25 March 1905. He was promoted to lieutenant on 9 April of the following year. Before the First World War, he saw active service on the North West Frontier of the British Indian Empire and was promoted to captain on 9 January 1913. During the war he fought in France and Mesopotamia, and was appointed a provost marshal on 7 March 1915. He served at the battles of Neuve Chapelle, Loos and the attempt to relieve Kut al Amara; he was wounded at Beit Aisa. Appointed a GSO 3rd Grade on 10 May 1917, he was brevetted to major on 1 January 1918 and promoted to acting major on 2 November. He returned to India and the Frontier and was a staff officer in the 1919 Afghan War and the subsequent campaign in Waziristan. On one occasion, the aircraft in which he was conducting reconnaissance crashed but he survived unhurt.
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