Concept

Leontopolis

Summary
Leontopolis was an ancient Egyptian city located in the Nile Delta, Lower Egypt. It served as a provincial capital and Metropolitan Archbishopric. The archaeological site and settlement are known today as Kafr Al Muqdam. Known most popularly in the modern era and to scholarship by its traditional Greek name "Leontopolis" Λεόντων πόλις (literally, "city of lions"), or Leonto Λεοντώ, ("lion"), the demographic makeup of the city varied culturally and linguistically over its long history, and the Greek name was progressively used more and more over the native Egyptian Taremu ("Land of Fish"). After the annexation of Ptolemaic Egypt as a Roman province, the city retained the Greek name, and was referred to in Latin sources as the oppidum Leontos, though the Egyptian name still lingered among primary speakers of Coptic Egyptian into the post-classical period. Today, the site itself is referred to in Arabic as Tell el-Muqdam ("mound of the city"). The city is located in the central part of the Nile Delta region. It was the capital of the 11th nome of Lower Egypt (the Leontopolite nome) and was probably the centre of pharaonic power under the 23rd dynasty. In his conquest-stela found at the fourth Nile Cataract at Jebel Barkal, Piye writes about his conquest over Iuput II. who ruled over Leontopolis. Strabo is the earliest writer who mentions either the nome, or its chief town: and it was probably of comparatively recent origin or importance. The Greek name of this city means "City of Lions", given on account of the presence of temples to the lioness goddesses Bast and Sekhmet, and their son, Maahes, the lion prince. Live lions were kept at the temples during the time of the Greek occupation. It became the capital of the Roman province of Augustamnica Secunda. As provincial capital it also was a Metropolitan archbishopric, known as Leontopolis in Augustamnica, which was to fade. Michel Le Quien lists Theodotus at the second Council of Constantinople in 553AD. and Metrodorus of Leontopolis signed the cannon of the Council of Ephesus.
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