Concept

Fulbright Hearings

Summary
The Fulbright Hearings refers to any of the set of U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on Vietnam conducted between 1966 and 1971. This article concerns those held by the U.S. Senate in 1971 relating to the Vietnam War. By April 1971, with at least seven pending legislative proposals concerning the war, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, chaired by Democratic Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas began to hear testimony. The 22 hearings, titled "Legislative Proposals Relating to the War in Southeast Asia", were held on eleven different days between April 20, 1971, and May 27, 1971. The hearings included testimony and debate from several members of Congress, as well as from representatives of interested pro-war and anti-war organizations. Jacob K. Javits (Republican — New York) Clifford P. Case (Republican — New Jersey) George D. Aiken (Republican — Vermont) Karl E. Mundt (Republican — South Dakota) John Sherman Cooper (Republican — Kentucky) Hugh Scott (Republican — Pennsylvania) James B. Pearson (Republican — Kansas) J. William Fulbright (Democrat — Arkansas) Claiborne Pell (Democrat — Rhode Island) Stuart Symington (Democrat — Missouri) John Sparkman (Democrat — Alabama) Mike Mansfield (Democrat — Montana) Frank Church (Democrat — Idaho) Gale W. McGee (Democrat — Wyoming) Edmund S. Muskie (Democrat — Maine) William B. Spong, Jr. (Democrat — Virginia) S. 376 — The Vietnam Disengagement Act, to amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to provide that after May 1, 1971, authorized or appropriated funds may be used in connection with activities of American Armed Forces in and over Vietnam only: to accomplish orderly termination of military operations and the safe withdrawal of remaining American Armed Forces by December 31, 1971; to assure the release of prisoners of war (POWs) and the safety of South Vietnamese who might be physically endangered by American withdrawal; and to provide assistance to South Vietnam consistent with these objectives. S. 974 — To amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to prohibit any involvement of U.
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