Concept

Mental disorders in fiction

Summary
Works of fiction dealing with mental illness include: The Tale of Samuel Whiskers or The Roly-Poly Pudding, 1908 children's book by Beatrix Potter. Tom Kitten comes out of his ordeal with a crippling phobia of rats, and possible posttraumatic stress disorder as well. Lisa, Bright and Dark, 1968 novel by John Neufeld. A story about a teenager's descent into madness. The Underground, 1998 science fiction book by K. A. Applegate. A form of oatmeal is found to drive extraterrestrial body-snatchers insane. Thirteen Reasons Why, 2007 novel by Jay Asher. About a teenage girl who is suffering from depression which results in suicide. Many other characters are also suffering from mental illnesses including bipolar, anxiety, PTSD, and also depression. Saint Jude, 2011 novel by Dawn Wilson. Suffering from manic-depressive illness, Taylor spends her senior year of high school at a place called Saint Jude's—essentially a group home for teenagers with mental illnesses. Freaks Like Us, 2012 young adult novel by Susan Vaught. The reader is taken on a suspenseful adventure through the mind of a schizophrenic teenage boy. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock, 2013 novel by Matthew Quick. Ajax, 450 – 430 BC; tragedy by Sophocles Heracles, 416 BC tragedy by Euripides and Hercules Furens, c. AD 40–60 tragedy by Seneca the Younger, both of which cover Hera filling Hercules with a homicidal madness. Orlando Furioso, 1516-1532; epic poem by Ludovico Ariosto, tells the story of Orlando, Charlemagne's most famous paladin, who goes mad upon learning that Angelica, the woman he is in love with, has run away with a Saracen knight. Filled with despair, Orlando travel through Europe and Africa destroying everything in his path. The English knight Astolfo flies up in a flaming chariot to the Moon, where everything lost on Earth is to be found, including Orlando's wits. He brings them back in a bottle and makes Orlando sniff them, thus restoring him to sanity. (At the same time Orlando falls out of love with Angelica, as the author explains that love is itself a form of insanity.
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