Concept

Chip Reese

Summary
David Edward "Chip" Reese (March 28, 1951 – December 4, 2007) was an American professional poker player and gambler from Centerville, Ohio. He is widely regarded as having been the greatest cash game poker player. Reese suffered from rheumatic fever during his years at elementary school and had to stay at home for almost a year. During this time, his mother taught him how to play several board and card games. Reese later described himself as "a product of that year." By the age of six, he was regularly beating fifth-graders at poker. In high school, he was a football player and was on the debate team, winning an Ohio State Championship and going to the National Finals. Reese attended Dartmouth after turning down an offer from Harvard. At Dartmouth, he became a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity, played freshman football briefly, participated in debate, and majored in economics. Reese also had tremendous success in poker games against students and some of his professors. He taught his fraternity brothers to play a variety of card games, including bridge as well as many poker variants. Reese played bridge at the Grafton County Grange. His fraternity later named their chapter card room, the "David E. Reese Memorial Card Room" in his honor. Reese was admitted to Stanford Law School, but decided instead to play poker professionally after winning 60,000inatournamentinLasVegas.BythetimehewouldhavestartedatStanford,hehadmade60,000 in a tournament in Las Vegas. By the time he would have started at Stanford, he had made 100,000. Reese's first visit to Las Vegas was so financially rewarding and so much fun, that he never left. He called his day job in Arizona several days later to quit and hired someone to fly to Arizona to clean out his apartment and drive his car to Las Vegas. Shortly afterwards, Reese collaborated on the seven-card stud section for Doyle Brunson's Super/System, the best-selling poker book of all time. In it, Brunson describes Reese as "one of the two finest young ... poker players in the world" and the best seven-card stud player he had ever played.
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