Concept

Bōsōzoku

Summary
running-out-of-control (as of a vehicle) tribe is a Japanese youth subculture associated with customized motorcycles. The first appearance of these types of biker gangs was in the 1950s. Popularity climbed throughout the 1980s and 1990s, peaking at an estimated 42,510 members in 1982. Their numbers dropped dramatically in the 2000s, with fewer than 7,297 members in 2012. Later in 2020 a rally that used to attract thousands of members only had 53 members, with police stating that it was a long time since they had to round up that many people. style traditionally involves boilersuits similar to those of manual laborers or leather military jackets with baggy pants, and tall boots. This uniform became known as the "special attack clothing" and is often adorned with kanji slogans. Typical accessories to this uniform are , surgical masks, and patches displaying the Rising Sun Flag. members are known for taking a Japanese road bike and adding modifications such as over-sized fairings, lifted handle bars shifted inwards, large seat backs, extravagant paint jobs, and modified mufflers. styles take inspiration from choppers, greasers, and Teddy boys. first started as groups of returning World War II veterans. The disobedient subculture originated in the 1950s when the young pilots came back from World War II. Many veterans faced difficulty readjusting to society after the war, and some turned to custom car making and gang-like activities on city streets to gain an adrenaline fix. These early took inspiration from American greaser culture and imported Western films; became known for its many similarities to old American biker culture. Many younger individuals began to see this style of life as very appealing, especially marginalized individuals looking for change. Eventually, these youngsters took over the identity, becoming the foundation for the modern . The 1970s were when the term of first truly began to emerge. This was a period of time characterized by actual riots between police and many of these youth groups.
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