Concept

Wyszogród

Summary
Wyszogród wy'szogrut is a town in central Poland, in Masovian Voivodeship, in Płock County, by the Vistula River. The population of Wyszogród was 2,793 in 2004. The settlement dates back to the 7th century, when there was a Slavic pagan temple at the site. In the 11th century Wyszogród became fortified and started to act as a local centre of commerce. In the 12th century it became the seat of local castellany and soon it became one of the seats of the Dukes of Masovia within fragmented Piast-ruled Poland. Relocated on Magdeburg Law in 1398, Wyszogród became one of the most important inland ports and centres of textile production in the area. Brewing and crafts also developed. In the 16th century, King Sigismund II Augustus approved the statutes of the guilds of tailors and furriers, and Sigismund III Vasa issued new privileges for several guilds. During the Deluge the town was pillaged and burnt by the Swedes. Several subsequent fires destroyed Wyszogród almost completely. During the Swedish invasion of Poland (1701–1706), Polish King Augustus II the Strong stayed in the town in 1704. After the Second Partition of Poland in 1793 it was annexed by Prussia. Prussia initiated German colonization and handed over the old Franciscan church to German Protestant colonists. The town also experienced an influx of Jews. In 1798 the Prussian administration dismantled the old castle of the Piast dynasty. In 1807 the town was reconquered by Poles and included within the short-lived Duchy of Warsaw and after the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815 it was transferred to so-called Congress Poland within the Russian Partition of Poland. During the January Uprising, on June 2, 1863, it was the site of a clash between Polish insurgents and Russian troops, won by the Poles. After World War I, Poland regained independence and control of the town. During the Polish–Soviet War, in August 1920, Polish troops were stationed nearby to defend the crossing over the Vistula River against a possible Soviet attack.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading