Concept

Japan Sumo Association

Summary
The Japan Sumo Association, sometimes abbreviated JSA or NSK, is the body that operates and controls professional sumo wrestling (called ōzumō, 大相撲) in Japan under the jurisdiction of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). This means concretely that the Association maintains and develops sumo traditions and integrity by holding tournaments and . The purposes of the Association are also to develop the means dedicated to the sport and maintain, manage and operate the facilities necessary for these activities. Therefore, the JSA operates subsidiaries such as the Kokugikan Service Company to organize its economic aspects, the Sumo School to organize training and instruction or the Sumo Museum to preserve and utilize sumo wrestling records and artefacts. Though professionals, such as active wrestlers, referees, hairdressers and ushers, are all on the Association's payroll, leadership positions are restricted to retired wrestlers. The organization has its headquarters in the Ryōgoku Kokugikan arena, in Sumida, Tokyo. Following a number of scandals, the Association has implemented numerous reforms in recent decades. TOC The Association has a long and rich history that dates back to the ancient rites of Shinto. Established in 1925 to award the "Prince Regent Cup" (later Emperor's Cup) during main tournaments, the Association became a Special Incorporated Foundation then a Public Interest Incorporated Foundation in 2014. Sumo The Association has its origins in a Shinto ritual (or festival) that has been held since ancient times to pray for a bountiful harvest. This primary form of sumo was called Shinji-zumo (神事相撲). In 1757, during the Hōreki era, the beginnings of the Association were established as "Edo-sumo Kaisho" (江戸相撲会所), later called Tokyo-sumo. During the Edo period, sumo bouts (called kanjin-sumo, 勧進相撲), were often held to raise funds to develop provinces (new construction or repair of bridges, temples, shrines and other public buildings) or for entertainment purposes.
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