Concept

Euphrates

Summary
The Euphrates (juːˈfreɪtiːz ; see below) is the longest and one of the most historically important rivers of Western Asia. Together with the Tigris, it is one of the two defining rivers of Mesopotamia (the land between the rivers). Originating in Turkey, the Euphrates flows through Syria and Iraq to join the Tigris in the Shatt al-Arab, which empties into the Persian Gulf. The Euphrates is the fifteenth-longest river in Asia and the longest in Western Asia, at about , and has a drainage area of that covers six countries. Etymology The term Euphrates derives from the Greek Euphrátēs (Εὐφρᾱ́της), presumably from εὖ (eû) "good" and φράζω (phrázō) "I announce or declare". The Greek form Euphrátēs was adapted from 𐎢𐎳𐎼𐎠𐎬𐎢, itself from 𒌑𒅁𒊏𒌅𒅖. The Elamite name is ultimately derived from a name spelt in cuneiform 𒌓𒄒𒉣 , which read as Sumerian is Buranuna and read as Akkadian is Purattu; many cuneiform signs have a Sumerian pronunciation and an Akkadian pronunciation, taken from
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