Concept

ELIZA effect

Summary
The ELIZA effect, in computer science, is the tendency to project human traits — such as experience, semantic comprehension or empathy — into computer programs that have a textual interface. The effect is a that arises when the program's symbolic computations are described through terms such as "think," "know" or "understand." History The effect is named for ELIZA, the 1966 chatbot developed by MIT computer scientist Joseph Weizenbaum. When executing Weizenbaum's DOCTOR script, ELIZA simulated a Rogerian psychotherapist, largely by rephrasing the "patients replies as questions: : Human: Well, my boyfriend made me come here. : ELIZA: Your boyfriend made you come here? : Human: He says I'm depressed much of the time. : ELIZA: I am sorry to hear you are depressed. : Human: It's true. I'm unhappy. : ELIZA: Do you think coming here will help you not to be unhappy? Though designed strictly as a mechanism to support "natural language conversation" with a computer, ELIZA's DOC
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