Summary
Family (from familia) is a group of people related either by consanguinity (by recognized birth) or affinity (by marriage or other relationship). It forms the basis for social order. The purpose of the family is to maintain the well-being of its members and of society. Ideally, families offer predictability, structure, and safety as members mature and learn to participate in the community. Historically, most human societies use family as the primary locus of attachment, nurturance, and socialization. Anthropologists classify most family organizations as matrifocal (a mother and her children), patrifocal (a father and his children), conjugal (a married couple with children, also called the nuclear family), avuncular (a man, his sister, and her children), or extended (in addition to parents and children, may include grandparents, aunts, uncles, or cousins). The field of genealogy aims to trace family lineages through history. The family is also an important economic unit studied in family economics. The word "families" can be used metaphorically to create more inclusive categories such as community, nationhood, and global village. One of the primary functions of the family involves providing a framework for the production and reproduction of persons biologically and socially. This can occur through the sharing of material substances (such as food); the giving and receiving of care and nurture (nurture kinship); jural rights and obligations; and moral and sentimental ties. Thus, one's experience of one's family shifts over time. From the perspective of children, the family is a "family of orientation": the family serves to locate children socially and plays a major role in their enculturation and socialization. From the point of view of the parent(s), the family is a "family of procreation", the goal of which is to produce, enculturate and socialize children. However, producing children is not the only function of the family; in societies with a sexual division of labor, marriage, and the resulting relationship between two people, it is necessary for the formation of an economically productive household.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications (18)

Loading

Loading

Loading

Show more
Related concepts (116)
Marriage law
Marriage law is the legal requirements that determine the validity of a marriage, and which vary considerably among countries. See also Marriage Act. Rights and responsibilities of marriages in the United States A marriage, by definition, bestows rights and obligations on the married parties, and sometimes on relatives as well, being the sole mechanism for the creation of affinal ties (in-laws). Over 2.3 million weddings take place in the U.S. each year.
Legitimacy (family law)
Legitimacy, in traditional Western common law, is the status of a child born to parents who are legally married to each other, and of a child conceived before the parents obtain a legal divorce. Conversely, illegitimacy, also known as bastardy, has been the status of a child born outside marriage, such a child being known as a bastard, a love child, a natural child, or illegitimate. In Scots law, the terms natural son and natural daughter carry the same implications.
Housewife
A housewife (also known as a homemaker or a stay-at-home mother/mom/mum) is a woman whose role is running or managing her family's home—housekeeping, which includes caring for her children; cleaning and maintaining the home; making, buying and/or mending clothes for the family; buying, cooking, and storing food for the family; buying goods that the family needs for everyday life; partially or solely managing the family budget—and who is not employed outside the home (i.e., a career woman).
Show more
Related courses (28)
MATH-110(a): Advanced linear algebra I
L'objectif du cours est d'introduire les notions de base de l'algèbre linéaire et de démontrer rigoureusement les résultats principaux de ce sujet.
MATH-111(a): Linear Algebra
L'objectif du cours est d'introduire les notions de base de l'algèbre linéaire et ses applications.
MATH-111(e): Linear Algebra
L'objectif du cours est d'introduire les notions de base de l'algèbre linéaire et ses applications.
Show more
Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs (3)
Mobility and Urbanism
Le cours présente un tour d’horizon introductif des interactions entre la mobilité et les dynamiques urbaines. Il propose des outils méthodologiques et opérationnels permettant d’appréhender et de rég
Mobility and Urbanism
Le cours présente un tour d’horizon introductif des interactions entre la mobilité et les dynamiques urbaines. Il propose des outils méthodologiques et opérationnels permettant d’appréhender et de rég
Planification des mobilités
Planification des mobilités est un cours conçu autour des enjeux environnementaux, économiques, territoriaux et sociaux qui sont liés à la mobilité aujourd’hui. Au-delà du transport, la mobilité englo