Concept

Cliveden set

Summary
The Cliveden Set was a 1930s upper-class group of politically influential people before the Second World War in the United Kingdom. They were in the circle of Nancy Astor, Viscountess Astor, the first female Member of Parliament to take up her seat. The name comes from Cliveden, a stately home in Buckinghamshire that was Astor's country residence. The "Cliveden Set" tag was coined by Claud Cockburn in his journalism for the communist newspaper The Week. His notion of an upper class pro-German conspiracy was widely accepted by opponents of Appeasement in the late 1930s. It was long accepted that the aristocratic Germanophile social network supported friendly relations with Nazi Germany and helped create the 1930s policy of appeasement. John L. Spivak, writing in 1939, devoted a chapter to the Cliveden Set. After the Second World War ended, the discovery of the Nazis' Black Book in September 1945 showed that all the group's members were to be arrested as soon as Britain had been
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