Concept

Unary operation

Summary
In mathematics, a unary operation is an operation with only one operand, i.e. a single input. This is in contrast to binary operations, which use two operands. An example is any function f : A → A, where A is a set. The function f is a unary operation on A. Common notations are prefix notation (e.g. ¬, −), postfix notation (e.g. factorial n!), functional notation (e.g. sin x or sin(x)), and superscripts (e.g. transpose AT). Other notations exist as well, for example, in the case of the square root, a horizontal bar extending the square root sign over the argument can indicate the extent of the argument. Examples Absolute value Obtaining the absolute value of a number is a unary operation. This function is defined as |n| = \begin{cases} n, & \mbox{if } n\geq0 \ -n, & \mbox{if } n
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