Concept

Merge sort

Summary
In computer science, merge sort (also commonly spelled as mergesort) is an efficient, general-purpose, and comparison-based sorting algorithm. Most implementations produce a stable sort, which means that the relative order of equal elements is the same in the input and output. Merge sort is a divide-and-conquer algorithm that was invented by John von Neumann in 1945. A detailed description and analysis of bottom-up merge sort appeared in a report by Goldstine and von Neumann as early as 1948. Algorithm Conceptually, a merge sort works as follows: #Divide the unsorted list into n sublists, each containing one element (a list of one element is considered sorted). #Repeatedly merge sublists to produce new sorted sublists until there is only one sublist remaining. This will be the sorted list. Top-down implementation Example C-like code using indices for top-down merge sort algorithm that recursively splits the list (called runs in this example) into sublists until
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