Concept

Marie Curie

Summary
Maria Salomea Skłodowska-Curie (ˈmarja salɔˈmɛa skwɔˈdɔfska kʲiˈri; ; 7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934), known simply as Marie Curie (ˈkjʊəri , maʁi kyʁi), was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win a Nobel Prize twice, and the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two scientific fields. Her husband, Pierre Curie, was a co-winner of her first Nobel Prize, making them the first-ever married couple to win the Nobel Prize and launching the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was, in 1906, the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris. She was born in Warsaw, in what was then the Kingdom of Poland, part of the Russian Empire. She studied at Warsaw's clandestine Flying University and began her practical scientific training in Warsaw. In 1891, aged 24, she followed her elder sister Bronisława t
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