Concept

Chashitsu

Summary
Chashitsu (茶室, "tea room") in Japanese tradition is an architectural space designed to be used for tea ceremony (chanoyu) gatherings. The architectural style that developed for chashitsu is referred to as the sukiya style (sukiya-zukuri), and the term sukiya (数奇屋) may be used as a synonym for chashitsu. Related Japanese terms are chaseki (茶席), broadly meaning "place for tea", and implying any sort of space where people are seated to participate in tea ceremony, and chabana, "tea flowers", the style of flower arrangement associated with the tea ceremony. Typical features of chashitsu are shōji windows and sliding doors made of wooden lattice covered in a translucent Japanese paper; tatami mat floors; a tokonoma alcove; and simple, subdued colours and style. The most typical floor size of a chashitsu is 4.5 tatami mats (). Definition In Japanese, free-standing structures specifically designed for exclusive tea ceremony use, as well as individual rooms intended for tea
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