Concept

Peterson's algorithm

Summary
Peterson's algorithm (or Peterson's solution) is a concurrent programming algorithm for mutual exclusion that allows two or more processes to share a single-use resource without conflict, using only shared memory for communication. It was formulated by Gary L. Peterson in 1981. While Peterson's original formulation worked with only two processes, the algorithm can be generalized for more than two. The algorithm The algorithm uses two variables: flag and turn. A flag[n] value of true indicates that the process n wants to enter the critical section. Entrance to the critical section is granted for process P0 if P1 does not want to enter its critical section or if P1 has given priority to P0 by setting turn to 0. The algorithm satisfies the three essential criteria to solve the critical-section problem. The while condition works even with preemption. The three criteria are mutual exclusion, progress, and bounded waiting. Since turn can take on one o
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