Concept

Systolic array

Summary
In parallel computer architectures, a systolic array is a homogeneous network of tightly coupled data processing units (DPUs) called cells or nodes. Each node or DPU independently computes a partial result as a function of the data received from its upstream neighbours, stores the result within itself and passes it downstream. Systolic arrays were first used in Colossus, which was an early computer used to break German Lorenz ciphers during World War II. Due to the classified nature of Colossus, they were independently invented or rediscovered by H. T. Kung and Charles Leiserson who described arrays for many dense linear algebra computations (matrix product, solving systems of linear equations, LU decomposition, etc.) for banded matrices. Early applications include computing greatest common divisors of integers and polynomials. They are sometimes classified as multiple-instruction single-data (MISD) architectures under Flynn's taxonomy, but this classification is questionable because
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