Summary
Linear or point-projection perspective () is one of two types of graphical projection perspective in the graphic arts; the other is parallel projection. Linear perspective is an approximate representation, generally on a flat surface, of an image as it is seen by the eye. Perspective drawing is useful for representing a three-dimensional scene in a two-dimensional medium, like paper. The most characteristic features of linear perspective are that objects appear smaller as their distance from the observer increases, and that they are subject to , meaning that an object's dimensions along the line of sight appear shorter than its dimensions across the line of sight. All objects will recede to points in the distance, usually along the horizon line, but also above and below the horizon line depending on the view used. Italian Renaissance painters and architects including Filippo Brunelleschi, Leon Battista Alberti, Masaccio, Paolo Uccello, Piero della Francesca and Luca Pacioli studied linear perspective, wrote treatises on it, and incorporated it into their artworks. Perspective works by representing the light that passes from a scene through an imaginary rectangle (the picture plane), to the viewer's eye, as if a viewer were looking through a window and painting what is seen directly onto the windowpane. If viewed from the same spot as the windowpane was painted, the painted image would be identical to what was seen through the unpainted window. Each painted object in the scene is thus a flat, scaled down version of the object on the other side of the window. File:Perspective-1point.svg File:Perspectivephoto.jpg File:Inside Greenwich Foot Tunnel.jpg File:One point perspective.jpg File:Finnish national road 4 Vierumäki.jpg File:HK Hung Hum Station Corridor.jpg File:Railroad-Tracks-Perspective.jpg File:Tuileries Rivoli Perspective.jpg File:College Street (9268126660).jpg File:Church Cottage at Boreham, Essex, England 2.jpg File:Harrington's hardware shop Broadstairs Kent England - inspiration for the 'Four Candles' Two Ronnies sketch 02.
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