Summary
The Hough transform is a feature extraction technique used in , computer vision, and . The purpose of the technique is to find imperfect instances of objects within a certain class of shapes by a voting procedure. This voting procedure is carried out in a parameter space, from which object candidates are obtained as local maxima in a so-called accumulator space that is explicitly constructed by the algorithm for computing the Hough transform. The classical Hough transform was concerned with the identification of lines in the image, but later the Hough transform has been extended to identifying positions of arbitrary shapes, most commonly circles or ellipses. The Hough transform as it is universally used today was invented by Richard Duda and Peter Hart in 1972, who called it a "generalized Hough transform" after the related 1962 patent of Paul Hough. The transform was popularized in the computer vision community by Dana H. Ballard through a 1981 journal article titled "Generalizing the Hough transform to detect arbitrary shapes". It was initially invented for machine analysis of bubble chamber photographs (Hough, 1959). The Hough transform was patented as in 1962 and assigned to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with the name "Method and Means for Recognizing Complex Patterns". This patent uses a slope-intercept parametrization for straight lines, which awkwardly leads to an unbounded transform space since the slope can go to infinity. The rho-theta parametrization universally used today was first described in although it was already standard for the Radon transform since at least the 1930s. O'Gorman and Clowes' variation is described in The story of how the modern form of the Hough transform was invented is given in In automated analysis of s, a subproblem often arises of detecting simple shapes, such as straight lines, circles or ellipses. In many cases an edge detector can be used as a pre-processing stage to obtain image points or image pixels that are on the desired curve in the image space.
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Localizing Polygonal Objects in Man-Made Environments

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Object detection is a significant challenge in Computer Vision and has received a lot of attention in the field. One such challenge addressed in this thesis is the detection of polygonal objects, whic
EPFL2015

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